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20130211
20130219
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
magazine" the latest from david ignatius of the "washington post," tom ricks of "foreign policy," and state department correspondent margaret brennan. we'll round it up on the with amy walt are aim amy walter, michael gerson, and our political director john dickerson. from out in space to here on earth, this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning, again on a day when there is no shortage of questions. we welcome dennis mcdonough president obama's me chief of staff, who i presume has brought many answers with him this morning. nice to have you. >> thanks for having me, bob. i'm really looking forward to it. >> schieffer: the sequester these draconian across-the-board spending cuts that are supposed to go into effect march 1. it appears to me that this is anything to happen. it looks to as if both the president and the congressional leaders have given up on each other. can this possibly happen? >> well, we've not give know up on this, bob and the reason we've not given up on this is be
policy front, some of the best foreign policy reporters in the business. david ignatius is with the "washington post," of course. tom ricks used to work for the "poat" is now contributing editor to "foreign policy" magazine and margaret brennan is our cbs news state department correspondent. before we get to foreign subjects here on earth, i want to talk about matters from outer space, and that meteorite that fell over siberia and injured over 1,000 people. so we're going back to new york to talk with the science editor and senior editor of "time" magazine jeffrey chewinger. jeffrey, let me start with the obvious. this thing caught our attention. there's no question about that. should we be worried about this? do these things pose a danger to those of us here on earth? >> well, they do and they don't. there's some comfort to be takenarchs we report in "time" magazine this week, that the earth has been playing in traffic for about 4 billion years now especially the time calmed the heavy bombardment period when the solar system hadn't quite acreeded yet. even today, every
. there were often serious questions about foreign policy betweens the party and the idea of holding up a nomination-- >> schieffer: two of them. >> two of them would be deeply unusual. >> these are very big appointments. these kinds of things happen all the time with smaller nominations and often we don't even find out who the senator is who is holding up the nomination. but this is, obviously, a very public play on the parent of senator grahams and i suspect there will be negotiations behind the scene. >> schieffer: do you think the republicans will back him? john mccain said he does not favor filibuster. i wonder if graham will have the backing. one senator can hold it up. clear me up on senate procedures. have to have 60 votes, wouldn't they to break that hold? >> i think a hold can sometimes keep away a vote of any number. i think what republicans are torn about here is the fact that on the one hand, they do think they have serious questions to raise about benghazi and that the american people have serious questions. on the other hand, when you get involved in libbia, there are alw
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)